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TRNERRs Coastal Training Program Featured in the National Estuarine Research Reserve Association (NERRA) Newsletter

Jul 04, 2020 02:18AM ● By Paul Spear
TRNERRs Coastal Training Program Featured in the National Estuarine Research Reserve Association (NERRA) Newsletter

Residents in the Tijuana River Watershed know that flooding from rain events can be a big problem for health and safety. "Flooding can not only cause ecological damage, it also presents major risk to human health and security in local communities," says Dr. Kristen Goodrich, coastal training program (CTP) coordinator at the Reserve.

Kristen Goodrich and Binational Liaison Ana Eguiarte worked on an interdisciplinary team on the Flood Resilience Infrastructure and Sustainable Environments (FloodRISE) project -an initiative to promote resilience to coastal flooding in Southern and Baja California by mapping hazards and making this information available to local communities. FloodRISE is led by the University of California, Irvine,and funded by the National Science Foundation. The Reserve's CTP program worked in the Tijuana River Valley and Los Laureles Canyon in Tijuana, Mexico.

"In Los Laureles, we knew the initial models weren't depicting what was happening," says Goodrich. "Through collaborative modeling we were able to reflect the reality-that significant debris can block flood water conveyance channels. One resident told us about a mattress blocking a culvert that caused head high flooding-that's something we couldn't have known without going into the community and listening."

Link to article: Local Knowledge Strengthens Flood Resilience

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